e677b151360b8cf82f761223c1aebdd0I can’t swim. 

Well, that’s not entirely true, I can tread water and kind of propel myself through the water and I’m not afraid of pools (don’t do water with critters except to sit in it), but I can’t like swim swim. You see when I was very little we were members of a local city pool and my mom would take us, my 2 older siblings and I during those long hot summer days. One such day tragedy struck and a little girl actually drowned when her hand got caught in a drain. The event sufficiently traumatized my mother enough that she never put me in swimming lessons. 

I love the water. It would definitely be my exercise preference except for the aforementioned non-existent swimming ability. But I realized this summer that it’s not too late. If I want to learn to swim all I have to do is take lessons. And it just so happens that at my alma-mater and where the Professor teaches they teach swimming lessons. Our girls had them this summer and will continue in the fall and I will be taking one-on-one lessons. I’m really quite excited. It’s kind of a life-long dream of mine to be able to do laps. I have no delusions of being graceful or being able to do much more than the breast stroke, but I don’t care. I just want to learn. 

Who knows, maybe after I learn to swim, I’ll take piano lessons (another life-long dream of mine.)

So how about it, y’all have any life-long dreams you’re pursuing? 


FHSO_Final500I had a book out recently – and I don’t think I’ve shared anything about it yet. So without further ado, let me share 5 fun facts about FOR HER SPY ONLY, the 2nd in my masquerading mistresses series. 

1. This book came from a Christmas blog I wrote. I was supposed to write a scene about characters stranded on Christmas Eve. I fell in love with the characters so much that when it came time to write the second book in my Masquerading Mistresses series, I scrapped my original idea and started with that blog. 

2. Alistair, the hero, has Aspergers. I wanted to write a different type of hero and all of his characteristics rang true for that, but it wasn’t easy incorporating it into the Regency world. 

3. This is my first book (so far) with a kiddo in it. 

4. I named my heroine Winifred because a lady came to my Weight Watchers meeting with that name and I just loved it, I told her I’d use it in a book some day. Oddly enough, she hasn’t been back…

5. And for the fifth thing, I’ll just share an excerpt…hope you love it. 

 

24th of December 1808, near the coastline of Sussex

 

 

Miss Winifred Wilmington pulled her green velvet cloak tighter around her. She exhaled and the puff of air was visible, so cold was it inside the carriage.

“We are going to die in here,” her maid, Polly, wailed.

Winifred rolled her eyes heavenward. “I seriously doubt that,” she said. “It is rather cold, but I suspect someone will be along soon enough and rescue us.”

“I could remind you that it was my suggestion that we leave earlier in the day. Or yesterday,” Polly grumbled. “It is the eve of Christmas, who else is traveling?”

The thought had crossed Winifred’s mind as well, but she certainly wouldn’t put voice to it. “Holmes went to search for help. Certainly he will find someone to assist us.”

There was no need to panic, as that would solve nothing. Therein lie the significant difference between herself and her longtime maid. Winifred was nothing if not practical. It was a skill she had learned out of necessity. One did not get jilted at the altar without adjusting one’s expectations of life and other people. In any case, she was somewhat concerned about being stranded in this frigid carriage all night, though she was hopeful that someone would come along to save them.

Polly sat up. “Do you hear that?”

Polly was so apt at creating drama, no doubt the woman thought she heard wolves outside. “What?” Winifred asked.

“A carriage is coming,” Polly said.

Winifred strained her ears, and certainly enough it did sound as if wheels were drawing nearer. Hope bloomed in her chest. The wheels rumbled and the horse hooves clattered louder and louder until they were upon them before they rolled to a stop.

“As long as it’s not a highwayman, I suppose we can consider ourselves rescued,” Winifred said.

Polly gasped, her hand going to her throat. “A highwayman!”

A male voice sounded outside the carriage, obviously speaking with his party unless Holmes had found this particular someone to salvage them.

There came a rap at the door. Winifred leaned forward and opened it.

A tall gentleman stood there in a great coat with a top hat perched upon his head. He held a cane in his hand. “Madams,” he said, the timber in his voice deep and rich.

A chill skirted over Winifred’s arms despite the cloak encasing her body. “Good evening, sir,” she said. “I hope my driver, Holmes, didn’t get you out of bed to rescue us.”

“I beg your pardon, I know no such man. I came upon your rig by happenstance.”

“Well, then, I should thank you for stopping to assist us. Can our carriage be repaired?”

“I do not know, nor am I inclined to look,” he said.

That wasn’t very gentlemanly of him. She opened her mouth to tell him precisely that—

“I will offer you a ride,” he said before she could comment.

Winifred considered his words. It wasn’t a perfect solution, but it would do. “Yes, my grandmother’s estate is not far from here. We would very much appreciate it.”

“No,” he said.

She started to thank him for his hospitality and then his words sank in. “I beg your pardon? Did you or did you not offer us a ride?”

“To where I am going. I am not a coach for hire.” He tapped his cane against his chest.

She had the childlike urge to mock him, but thought better of it. Her options for getting out of this predicament were rather limited, so she best mind her manners.

“In the morning, you may have the carriage take you to your destination,” he continued. “But in this weather, I am going nowhere else.”

“And where is it that you’re going?” Winifred asked.

“Coventry Hall,” he said.

Nerves prickled at her neck, standing the little hairs on end. “You are?” Winifred asked.

“Alistair Devlin, Marquess of Coventry,” he said with only a shadow of a bow.

“Oh good heavens,” Polly said, finally breaking her silence. She shook her head violently. “Miss Wilmington, we mustn’t go with him. We can wait for Holmes.”

“Don’t be rude, Polly.”

“Yes, don’t be rude, Polly,” he repeated. “I don’t believe you’ll have any other options tonight.” His shoulders rose in a slight shrug. “Though you could certainly choose to stay here and freeze,” he said. “I have made the offer.” He turned on his heel and walked away.

“Miss Wilmington, you know what they say of him,” Polly said once he was out of earshot. She gripped Winifred’s arm tightly. “Mary, who works for Lord Garrick, says she knows the housekeeper that used to work at Coventry. He is a killer,” she whispered. “Murdered his own wife, tossed her right off a cliff, they say.”

“Don’t be so dramatic.” But of course Winifred had also heard those rumors and plenty more when it came to the Marquess of Coventry. He had a most interesting reputation. Of course the fact that he rarely, if ever, was seen in London, only fueled said rumors.

Unfortunately the man was right. The odds of someone else coming along to rescue them were very slim. “It is a good offer,” Winifred said. “Our only offer, as it were.”

“He could be dangerous,” Polly warned.

“He is a peer of the realm. Rumor or not, there is a code of etiquette.” When Polly looked unconvinced, Winifred continued. “Consider that being tossed off a cliff should result in a rather quick death, whereas freezing in this carriage would be slow and painful, I suspect.”

Polly closed her eyes and shook her head as if warding off the image.

“Excuse me, I should like to get down please,” Winifred called out. Nerves fluttered in the pit of her stomach, though it could have been the chill from the opened carriage door. Several breaths passed before a footman appeared to assist her to the ground. “Oh, you must be one of the marquess’s men. Thank you.”

The man nodded, but said nothing. The snow swirled around her, soft as a whisper, covering her face and sticking to her eyelashes. She put her hands in her muff and walked quickly toward the other carriage.

Polly raced up to meet her. “Miss Wilmington, think of your reputation.”

“Don’t be silly. I am a spinster who was jilted. Besides, my reputation has already been damaged. Furthermore, my reputation certainly won’t matter if I freeze to death, now will it?”

“I shall not ride with that man,” Polly said with a firm nod of her head.

“Suit yourself, you can wait for Holmes. Do try to stay warm,” Winifred said.

“If you go with him, I shall resign,” Polly warned.

“Don’t bother, I shall simply dismiss you,” Winifred said.

Polly made a growling noise, yet still followed behind. “I shall come with you to keep you safe, but I refuse to ride inside with him.”

“Do whatever you wish. I am riding inside where it promises to be nice and cozy.”

And with that a gloved hand reached out of the carriage door. She took a deep breath, placed her hand in his, and climbed into the carriage. A lantern hung from a hook, illuminating the interior. She took a seat on the plush bench across from the marquess. “Thank you for your hospitality.”

“I instructed my footman to stay and wait for your driver.”

He certainly did not appear to be murderous. Not that she had any notion of what a murderer might do or say.

“Your maid, she is going to ride outside?” he asked.

“She’s a stubborn lot,” Winifred said.

“You sacked her,” he said.

“Third time this week.” She waved her hand dismissively. “Polly and I have plenty of disagreements.”

He nodded, then picked up the book that had been sitting on the seat next to him. The carriage lurched forward.

She eyed her unlikely travel companion. He wasn’t a friendly sort; formidable was more what she’d consider him. He was tall and lean and imposing, but younger than she had expected. She’d heard of the Marquess of Coventry, but had never before seen him. His reputation in London was notorious. He could not be more than thirty. His cane leaned against the bench next to him, and his gloved hand held onto the gold knob on top. An ugly scar slashed across his left cheek, leading up to his eye.

He looked up from his reading as if he sensed her perusal. His eyes were a startling shade of green, like the first bloom of spring after a blistering winter.

“My name is Winifred Wilmington,” she said dumbly.

“Indeed,” he said, then went back to his reading.

She felt her brow furrow. “What are you reading?” she asked.

“Shakespeare. As You Like It,” he said.

She was quiet for a moment, trying to recall if she’d read that particular play. It seemed she must have, but she couldn’t recall a single thing about it.

“You know I am not afraid of you,” she said. Her mother used to chastise her about her chattiness, but Winifred had a tendency to talk when she was nervous. And the marquess’s silence had her quite addled. “I don’t think it’s very intelligent to believe everything you hear about a person.”

“I see,” he said, not bothering to look up from his book.

“Oh yes, people are quite spiteful with the rumors they spread.” She forced herself to stop talking as she was about to tell him a particularly nasty rumor, but that would be gossiping. She knew she became chatty when she was nervous, and she certainly did not need to say something she would later regret. And she knew the sting of being on the other end of those rumors. When Theodore had left her standing alone with the priest and the church full of onlookers, people had made all sorts of conclusions.

“What is it that people say about me?” he asked, again not looking up from his book.

She studied him for a moment, trying to gauge if he was toying with her. He must know what people said. Even the servants gossiped about him.

He looked up at her and once again she was caught in those unusual eyes. His right brow rose expectedly.

She swallowed. “That you murdered your wife.” Her voice came out weak.

“But you do not believe that,” he said.

“No, I do not.” She shook her head. “You are obviously a responsible and kind gentleman.”

You do not know me,” he said. He set his book aside. His glove gripped the gold knob on his cane.

“No, but you stopped to assist a stranded lady. That says volumes about your character, my lord,” she said, quite pleased with her logic.

He leaned forward, his eyes narrowed. “How do you know I’m not taking you to my castle to ravish you?”

She sucked in her breath. His words should have driven fear into her heart. They should have made her second-guess climbing into this carriage with him. Instead she became acutely aware of how she must look with her traveling cloak and bonnet. She resisted the urge to pat her hair.

“Are you? Going to ravish me, that is?” she couldn’t help asking. No man had ever been so forthcoming with her, and the effect was rather intoxicating.

He crooked his finger at her, beckoning her forward.

Curiosity gripped her. She leaned toward him. He had lovely eyes, mossy green with long lashes.

He grabbed her by the chin and pulled her closer, then caught her mouth in a kiss. So shocked by the touch, her lips parted, giving him a brazen invitation to deepen the kiss. His lips were soft and unfamiliar, yet seductive, intoxicating. Her eyes fluttered closed and her hands gripped the fabric of his great coat around his shoulders. And then the kiss was over, ending as quickly and abruptly as it had begun. He leaned back in his seat and she was left in the middle of the carriage with her eyes closed, no doubt looking very much the goose.

“You should not be so trusting,” he said.

He was right. Of course he was right. Yet, she felt no fear with him, even at the liberty he had just taken. She felt only curiosity and something that was probably desire, at the very least attraction and intrigue. “You never answered my question,” she shot back once she’d regained her senses.

“Which was?”

“If you were intending to ravish me once we arrived at your castle?”

His lips quirked up in a half smile. “I suppose you’ll have to wait and see.”

 


Several of the Jaunty Quills were in San Antonio last week for the Romance Writers of America conference. We thought you’d like to see some photos from the conference (at the bottom of the page, there’s a legend telling about each photo).

Cindy and Nancy at the HQ party Cindy and Nora HQ party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jaunty Quills breakfast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kristan and her Rita awards date

Nancy at the HQ authors signing

Kristan at the HQ signing

Nancy and Kathy before their workshop Nancy and Kathy with Jane Porter Nancy and Kristan with RaeAnne Thayne photo (2) photo (3) photo (4) Robyn at the literacy signing Shana  going to the Source books dinner Shana and Mia looking fancy at the Rita awards Shana at the literacy autographing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy at the RWA literacy signing

 

 

 

 

unnamedKristan, Gail Kirkpatrick Chianese, Virginia Kantra  and Jesse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Cindy and Nancy with former Jaunty Emily McKay at the Harlequin Party.

2. Cindy and Nora Roberts.

3.  The gorgeous decorations at the Harlequin party.

4. Friday was Cindy’s birthday.  Harlequin threw a big party just for her. Shhh! Don’t tell her they the party was for everyone. ;)

5.  The annual Jaunty Quills breakfast.

6. Kristan and Alexander Rodriguez.

7.  Nancy at the Harlequin authors book signing (signing Cindy’s birthday card).

8.  Kristan at the Harlequin authors book signing.

 9. Nancy and Kathy before the workshop they presented.

10.  Nancy, Jane Porter, and Kathy at the Harlequin party.

11.  Raeanne Thayne, Nancy, and Kristan.

12. Cindy, Nancy, Kathy and Harlequin editor Susan Litman at the Harlequin party.

13. Harlequin editor Patience Bloom and Cindy at the Harlequin party.

14. Nancy and Kathy.

15.  Robyn at the RWA Literacy signing.

16.  Shana looking beautiful before her publisher’s party.

17. Shana and Mia before the Golden Heart and Rita awards.

18.  Shana at the RWA Literacy signing.

19. Nancy at the RWA Literacy book signing.

20.  Nancy, Kathy, and Mary Louise Wells realize former Jaunty Terri Brisbin was on their flight home.

21. Kristan, Gail Kirkpatrick Chianese, Virginia Kantra,  and Jesse.

 


Has nothing to do w/this blog, but I love Logan Echolls!

Not too long ago I did a blog post on the best romantic comedy movies. Recently I’ve been thinking about why these movies work so well and I think they, in addition to romance novels, work because they hit on tried and true elements that just work for us. These are called tropes or cliches or plot devices, whatever you call them, they’re used again and again because they work. I went through that list of of rom coms we put together and tried to identify the trope(s) that the movie uses, well, for some of them, this list was too long to do all of them. (If you want more info on tropes, then here’s a great blog about them). 

  • French Kiss – this is classic Bait & Switch, where she’s masquerading a relationship with him to get the attention of another man only to fall in love with the first man. Le sigh…
  • Working Girl – this is kind of a spin on the boss/secretary trope paired with mistaken identity paired with the different classes. He’s rich and successful and powerful and she’s an overworked and under appreciated secretary who ends up masquerading as her boss’s partner. 
  • Six Days and Seven Nights – here we have forced proximity, I mean they’re literally deserted together on an island. There is also an age difference as well as well as opposites attract. And Harrison Ford, which always helps, but you know I don’t think there is a HF trope. :-) There should be though!
  • Notting Hill – simple boy from small London neighborhood meets uber famous American actress & they end up forced together. 
  • 27 Dresses – Here we have mistaken identity paired with enemies to lovers. A good example that the enemies don’t have to hate each other so much they want the other person dead, they just have chemistry and don’t understand it. 
  • The Cutting Edge - Who doesn’t love a good Taming of the Shrew story? We also have opposites attract and forced proximity, it all combines for a great movie. 

So what do you think? Do you have certain types of stories (or tropes) that you will read/watch again and again? I know that I’m a total sucker for marriage of convenience/forced proximity as well as best friends to lovers. 


I don’t know about y’all, but I love summer movies. I don’t get to go to them as often as I used to, or would like to, because of the kiddos, but I still like to keep track of what’s coming out. And so far this year isn’t really exciting, not only that, but I’ve already seen 2 on my list.

X-Men: Days of Future Past – now I’ve been a fan of the X-Men series from the beginning and so this one was pretty high on my list. One of the cool things about this particular installment is that you get to see a different side to Xavier. I thought James McAvoy was fantastic, just a super performance. And the movie had great bits of humor in it.

MV5BMjAwMzAzMzExOF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwOTcwMDA5MTE@._V1_SX214_AL_Maleficent – I’ve been looking forward to this movie for YEARS. Ever since I saw the first news story that they were making it. I think most girls who grew up watching Sleeping Beauty had a fascination for the villain – she’s by far the coolest and most interesting of the Disney villains. We went and saw this last weekend and it didn’t disappoint. I thought it was a creative retelling of the Sleeping Beauty tale and Angelina Jolie was perfect for the role.

How To Train Your Dragon 2 – frankly I’d go see this one even if I didn’t have kids. The first one was fantastic and I just can’t wait for this installment. I’ve been a fan of Jay Baruchel for a while, I can’t really pinpoint why, but he voices the lead character in these movies and he’s fantastic. But I do have kids and my girls are super excited to see this one. I’m sure we’ll set aside some time before the movie comes out to re-watch the first one.

And that’s really it for me for summer movies. But I did see a preview for a movie coming out this fall and I’m SOOOO excited. It’s called Kingsman: The Secret Service and it’s about a secretive, elite group of spies and how they recruit new members. And Colin Firth is in it. Seriously, folks I could have written this. Okay, that’s probably not really true, but I’ve write 2 series with secret agencies and I’m about to start my 3rd. This is so right up my alley and did I mention Colin Firth is in it?

http://youtu.be/hasKmDr1yrA You’re welcome….

So what’s on your must see movie list?


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