Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

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imagesI have this fantasy of flipping a house, or restoring a house. I have no skills in this arena and would probably lop off a limb within an hour of getting started, but I still want to try.

I indulged in this fantasy when I wrote SOMEBODY TO LOVE a few years ago. Parker Harrington, once a trust-fund baby, finds herself broke with one asset left—a crumbling little house on the northern coast of Maine. (FYI, you can order this book here!)

 

I could be very happy here.

Anyway, this is exactly what I want for myself. Granted, I have no relatives who are going to leave me anything, let alone waterfront property, no matter how decrepit. But all those TV shows about flipping houses, or finding a hidden gem that just needs a good…uh…whatever houses need. Cleaning, that I could do. I am rather gifted in the art of cleaning, thanks to my Hungarian ancestors, who would do things like boil clothes on the stove to make sure they were pure white, and dust the pipes in the cellar to show you loved God.

Back to my yearning to restore a house. When I take the train to Manhattan, this urge is especially strong. Once upon a time, my husband and I heard about a crumbling Brooklyn brownstone that was for sale for $100,000. At the time, it might as well have been $10,000,000 (which is what it’s worth now). I think about that place all the time, gang. All the time. Coulda woulda shoulda.

1_ACH_Su16_Restoration

I am confident I could do this. Or at least, watch McIrish do this.

Another place is a crumbling Arts & Craft bungalow in the next town. It hasn’t been painted in decades, and cedar trees have all but hidden it, but I can see the lead-pained windows and imagine the porch, now jam-packed with junk, clean and airy, with big Boston ferns and a comfy wicker couch.

This Old House magazine has a feature called Save That House (or something; I’m on the train right now and can’t Google it). It features an historic house that’s going to be demolished if someone doesn’t step in. “Please!” I say to McIrish, who has all the manly carpentery skills I lack. “Come on! You know you want to!”

“That house is in Kentucky,” he’ll point out. “We live in Connecticut.”

“So? I’ve never been to Kentucky. I bet I love Kentucky. There are horses there.” I also love horses.

Me, if I were younger, blond, beautiful and capable. This is actually Nicole Curtis from HGTV, who has my dream job (and dream skill set).

I picture myself clad in paint-stained overalls, looking adorable. The fact that I am a terrible painter is irrelevant. In my fantasy, I wield a sledgehammer and tear down that wall that will make all the difference between a cramped, ugly, outdated kitchen and pure bliss. I clean the dull and dirty stained-glass windows with vinegar, revealing their former glory. I know all the tricks.

For now, though, I guess I’ll just have to write about these things. It’s probably best this way.

What the heck! I’ll give away a print copy of SOMEBODY TO LOVE to one commenter. It’s a great summer read, if I do say so myself.

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

From Kristan’s “best of” blog series…

I always wonder what I’d do in case of a real emergency. McIrish, as many of you know, is a firefighter, so I’m always hearing stories of risk and rescue. I’ve never been tested — not yet — and I constantly picture myself in any given situation. Would I panic? Would I risk my life to save another?

car-submerged-in-water-558x279 I like to think I would, of course. Many are the times I’ve imagined diving into a pond to rescue a child, or putting pressure on a wound until the paramedics arrived, or yes, even rushing into a burning building and emerging with a victim.

And of course, every time I fly, I imagine what it would be like to crash. Having a fear of drowning above all other forms of death, I’ve shuddered at the words “in case of a water landing.” Until Thursday, in case of water landing has been a joke. There are no water landings, of course. A plane hits the water, and everyone dies.

I wrote about this subject on my own blog. I am admittedly obsessed with the case of Flight 1549. The NTSB may as well call on me to testify, because I’ve studied that footage like it’s the Rosetta Stone. I keep reliving that miracle, for really, sometimes that word just fits. So much went right that day. Captain Sully. The valiant FDNY and Coasties. Those great people who were driving on the West Side Highway, telling the 911 dispatcher just where the plane was passing now. The ferryboat passengers who tossed lifejackets to those in the water. Everyone lived. Everyone! It was a miracle.

alg-us-airways-hudson-jpgYesterday, President Obama called for unity in times of crisis, for sacrifice from every American. He recalled the strength of character our country was founded on, and I thought of Flight 1549 again.

According to CBS radio, last Thursday a man found himself in the back of Flight 1549. Water was flooding in fast. Fearful that his waterlogged clothes would slow him down, terrified that he would drown while trapped in the plane, he stripped down to his underwear and swam up the aisle. When he emerged outside in the 17 degree weather, his fellow passengers, scared, stunned, wet and frigid, immediately gave him their clothes.

They took off their clothes in that weather, and without hesitation, without forethought, they covered the freezing man.

100303105200resized_Chelsey_Sullenberger_Captain_SullyLast Thursday, America worked as we citizens all hope and believe it can, not just in training and preparedness, but in heart. A captain set his powerless plane on the Hudson River, and no one died. Everyone was rescued within minutes. The best of our country was seen by the world — the extraordinary heroism, kindness and generosity of the ordinary citizen.

Are you so excited about seeing the movie based on this event? Tom Hanks…perfect!

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

 

I have a confession to make, gang. For the past few days, I’ve been on a staycation. I finished a book and for the first time in, oh, twelve years, I’m not under contract. I don’t have a deadline. I have two finished books in the hopper and so I find myself…relaxing.

Most of the trips I take are work-related. Once in awhile, the kids, McIrish and I go somewhere, but I always have to work at least a few hours a day. But this past week…nope. I’ve had some work-related tasks—I’m giving some workshops and panels at a conference in a couple of weeks, and I had to go over the copyedits of my next book. I taught an online class one afternoon.

But mostly, I’m doing nothing. And it’s wonderful. I’ve seen a bunch of friends, spent some time on the phone, read books on the porch, taken naps, gone shopping, got a manicure. Yesterday, McIrish and I went into New York City on the spur of the moment to watch some of the Pride Parade and have dinner at the place we’ve been going since we were engaged—Porto Bello on Thompson Street.

I think this staycation may be the best vacation of my life.

Have you ever taken a real staycation, where you try to enjoy things closer to home? I’d love to hear about them.

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

 

imageIt’s no secret that we women love our girlfriends—we have book clubs and best friends from every phase of our life, and we can talk to our besties at a level of such intimacy and trust, and it’s WONDERFUL.

Until it’s not. Until someone regrets being a little too open.

I had that happen with a friend. You know how it can be—instant best friends, you just hit it off so fast, and it’s kind of thrilling. It’s like in college, when you got assigned a roommate, and holy heckerama, she’s PERFECT for you.

And then…you find out something. Once you know it, you can’t un-know it.

In my case, a friend had told me about her dramatic family life. The stories were full of tragedy and sorrow and her own resolution and love and how she overcame and gave of herself, and I was sitting there, half in love and completely in awe of her and all that she did.

Except, as the years wore on, it turned out she didn’t do all those things. And when it became clear that her stories contradicted each other—and I asked for clarification—she got kind of wriggly. Sort of like I asked about the truth according to Version 1, and she didn’t want to untangle the contradictions in Version 2, so it was just easier to not talk about it anymore.

husband-shares-list-of-what-makes-his-wife-cryIn a different scenario, much like that in If You Only Knew, a friend of mine was The World’s Best Friend to a woman who’s husband was cheating on her. She was the shoulder to cry on, the Listener, and she was so, so supportive. But then, the wife forgave the husband (insert screech of indignation here). And my friend was left out in the cold. She knew. She knew the happy family presented on Facebook was largely fictional, and she knew the husband was a complete creep, and she knew everything!

The cheated-on wife just couldn’t face my friend anymore. Every time she saw my friend’s face, she was reminded of her husband’s infidelity and lack of morality. She wanted to forget it…but my friend was a reminder.

IYOK mm fcIn If You Only Knew, Rachel is dealing with the fact that her husband seems to have cheated on her. Where do you turn but to a sister? Who else would be as fierce a protector as a sister? But then, if you decide to try to work things out…if everyone deserves a second chance, what about that sister who still hates your husband for what he’s put you through?

Oh, I just love a sloppy mess of human emotions, don’t you?

Have you ever been in this kind of position? You know I’d love to hear about it!

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

watermelonIn the book I’m writing now, the character had an absolutely wretched adolescence. This is because I think most people had an absolutely wretched adolescence. I did! Lordy, I felt downright cursed at times. Recently, my daughter had the audacity to look at pictures of her 12-year-old self and call herself a dork. Princess, please! You have no idea! None whatsoever, you of the shiny hair and huge eyes and long eyelashes and Snow White skin! You who have never been overweight or asked why you’re so hairy by a boy or who was foolish enough to do a gymnastics routine in front of the entire school! Get to the back of the line, missy! I own teenage misery, thank you very much!

Where were we? Oh, yes, writing.

Nora, my heroine, has a lot in common with me as a teenager…except she has it worse, because in fiction, it’s just more interesting if the characters suffers. So it made me think of all the horrible ways we women suffered from the ages of, oh…twelve onward.

Not being comfortable in your own skin. I don’t think there are too many adolescent girls who look in the mirror or take their showers every day and think, “Gosh, I love myself and these exciting new changes! What fun!” Nora and I…we just woke up one day, four inches taller than the night before with these uncomfortable bumps on our chests and manly hair on our legs.

379120894_1280x720Social anxiety. Whether you seemed to have it all together or you were trembling in a corner, I think adolescence breeds worry. Am I popular enough? Are these friends true? If I go to that dance, will I have someone to talk to? What will I wear? Will it be okay? Will I get invited to that party? If not, how can I pretend it doesn’t matter? God, aren’t you glad you’re not a teenager anymore?

Changing family dynamics. Poor Nora. Her dad leaves the family when she’s eleven. This is not taken from my own life, happily. But adolescence was that dreadful time when I started to realize my parents didn’t have all the answers, that they were flawed, and, well…human. Not reassuring.

d_ZgMC_nLove. Nora falls in love when she’s a teenager, as most teenagers do. It’s horrible. She knows it’s horrible, and it brings her no pleasure whatsoever, and NO, he’s not the hero of the story. But she loves him just the same, in that aching, wretched way that happens when you’re well aware that no happily ever after awaits. Me, I didn’t fall in love as a teenager. But when a boy fell in love with me and dumped his girlfriend—my very good friend—I got pulled into the melee of teenage hormones and emotions just the same. We never recovered from that, my friend and I, even though I can honestly say I was blameless and gobsmacked. I understand, though. Still, it’s a shame.

So now I want you to be very brave and admit something wretched from your tender adolescent and teenage years. There’s safety in numbers. One of you will get a copy of UNTIL THERE WAS YOU, in which Posey, our heroine, endures the world’s worst prom this side of Carrie…and manages to end up a pretty great person nonetheless.

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