Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

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IF YOU ONLY KNEW got a starred review from Library Journal and called Kristan “the queen of the summertime read with a little something more.” Kristan plans to get a tiara to celebrate!

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

Susan Gorman, you’re the winner of a signed copy of THE BEST MAN! Send me your snail mail addy, and I’ll get out to you. k.higgins@snet.net

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

cannonballNext week, we’re going to have a family picnic at my mom’s house. There will be aunts and uncles and cousins, and children of cousins and second cousins, and some friends thrown in, too. The kids will swim in the pool, my uncle Chris and McIrish will compete to see who can make the biggest cannonball splash, sloshing innocent bystanders, and our dog might go in for a few victory laps.

There will be cards—setback, no one plays anything else at picnics. If you forget what trump is, beware. We take cards very seriously. We might play some badminton. There will be a cooler filled with beer and soda and wine. In the tradition of my dearly departed grandfather, someone will walk through the screen door.

Once in a while, there’s a fight over politics or some long-held grudge, but my mom, who is now the matriarch of our clan, has generally put the smackdown on that. Still, someone’s bound to leave with hurt feelings from some vague or imagined slight. Tradition, you see. More than that, there will be stories and laughs and some pretty terrible jokes and awkward puns.

But mostly, there will be food.

Now, yes, we’ll have hamburgers and hot dogs. We’re Americans, after all. But for some reason, we’ve never mastered the art of a plain-old cookout with ribs and potato salad. Oh, we have that, sure! But not only that. Let me introduce you to some of the strange delights of my mother’s picnics.

Demetzky_baconSzalonna. Oh, the deliciousness of szalonna! In a nutshell, it’s a big slab of pork fat that you skewer with a wooden stick, hold over the grill and, when it’s dripping with fat, press the fat onto a large piece of sourdough bread. Return fat to fire. Repeat 20 or 30 times. Top with sliced onions and tomatoes. Enjoy. Don’t tell your doctor about this, FYI.

Lasagna. What? At a picnic? Yep. My mom is always afraid there won’t be enough food. For the record, there’s enough food for us and all our ravaging ancestors, too.

Meatballs and sauce, no pasta. I have no explanation for this one.

Wings that are not buffalo. Again, my sainted mother. She makes these delicious, incredibly sloppy wings that have a liquid sauce, and in the grand tradition of things, spills the sauce down the front of her Yankees t-shirt, requiring her to curse and change into another Yankees t-shirt. A dog will happily lick up the spill.

Red-Velvet-Cheesecake-CakeCake. My aunt Rita makes the best cake known to mankind. Forget your pies, your chocolate chip cookies, your ice cream sandwiches! Let us eat cake!

Biscotti. My uncle’s wife is Italian, so we always have biscotti at our picnics. Wicked good biscotti, too. Because there is biscotti, we end up having coffee. Not terribly picnicky, but there you go.

Got any fun picnic or family gathering traditions? I’m giving away a copy of THE BEST MAN book to a commenter, because the Holland family and their family…well, they’re the best!

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

This is a blog about this blog.

I joined in 2008, when I was a brand-new, unknown author. Cindy Kirk invited me, and I was so grateful because I’d never blogged before. My agent told me I should probably “get out there.” I didn’t personally know any of the other authors except Cindy, and they had never heard of me.

Since then, I’ve fallen a bit in love with the JQs. My fellow writers here are thoughtful, kind, hardworking, intelligent women. In a day when writer blogs have decreased in popularity and most group blogs have disappeared, we’ve stayed. And we’ve stayed because we love each other, and we love you guys, and the community we have here.

Whenever we see each other at conferences, as we did this past week, it’s a moment of sanity and a rush of happiness at the same time—we all have dozens of friends in the writing community, but the blog binds us in a special way. We write to each other about personal problems, professional issues, familial happiness or turmoil. When one of us hits a milestone or gets a great review, we’re so stinkin’ proud of each other. When Jesse became a mom this past year, it’s fair to say we all had a little god motherly love for Wallaby.

And then there’s you. Our faithful readers who laugh with us, who buy our books, who take the time out of your busy lives to comment on a new book or a guest author. When I wrote my last blog about being fat-shamed, you guys had my back. You share our lives, and you’re part of ours.

I just wanted to say thank you for that. You are so valued, more than I can say.

xox

Kristan 

Kristan Higgins

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Kristan Higgins is a New York Times bestselling author and two-time winner of the Romance Writers of America RITA Award. Her books have been called "perfect entertainment for a girl's night in" (Booklist), "hilarious and heartfelt" (Romance Junkies) and "the best I've ever read" (Kristan's husband).

Kristan is the mother of two lovely children, the wife of a firefighter and the owner of a very naughty dog. She loves to eat out, watch movies and of course, read.

Kristan's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

Know the word pentimento? I hereby declare it to be today’s Word of the Day.

The wiki definition of pentimento is “an alteration in a painting, evidenced by traces of previous work, showing that the artist has changed his or her mind as to the composition during the process of painting.” The first time I saw the word was as the title of a book: Lillian Hellman’s autobiographical essays, which my parents owned. I skimmed that copy, put it back on a shelf and forgot about it. We had more than enough to read: my parents’ house had nearly as many overstuffed shelves as a small used bookstore.

oldstreetBack to our Word of the Day.  I was in New York with my family when I pointed out a ghostly sewing machine painted on the side of a brick building. My brother—who is and was a know-it-all–announced that the nearly vanished painted ad is called a pentimento. I didn’t believe him because he often made pronouncements that weren’t true. And, hey, why would Lillian Hellman write about ancient advertisements on old brick buildings?

It’s true, he insisted and don’t call them pentimentos. The plural is pentimenti. (He was right about that.)

We’d noticed that form of art in New York—and some really are (or were) beautiful–when we visited our relatives and our dentist, who was also a relic of a bygone era. After that day, I began to spot the ghostly remnants everywhere in the city, ephemeral traces of hand-painted block letters and sometimes even pictures left from long-vanished products or businesses owned by long-dead people. I see those in other towns and cities too.

Even as a kid, I noticed that New York, unlike other cities I knew, held on to marks of its past but kind of carelessly. You’d walk past a few of those monstrous all-glass buildings, turn a corner and see some fancy brickwork on the sidewalk, or actual cobblestones, or a large flat stone that my brother told me passengers used to step onto a horse or into a horse-drawn carriage. (Yes, he was right about that, too. Sigh.) It might have been the neighborhoods we visited, but at least when I was a kid, no one particularly celebrated these leftovers from history. They just moldered along with everything else.

Most of the old wall paintings I noticed are gone–they’re not protected by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.  However the past is popular with New Yorkers these days. Now you can go on all sorts of tours where the guides know about the city’s history and point out the details of past lives lingering among the big newer buildings. I love those tours, but I also rather liked it when I felt as if we were the only ones to notice the scrollwork on some iron bars or the faint advertisement on the side of a building. It was a kind of ghost-hunting—and in fact the more common name for those traces of paint is “ghost signs.”

Still, I prefer the name pentimento for them. That makes it seem as if New York itself is the artist, not quite erasing the past as it keeps piling on more layers, covering up the old ones except in special spots where the shape of its history is faintly visible.

If you want to see an example of a New York ghost sign, here’s a very old one in Times Square, uncovered, and then covered again, in 1998. http://www.frankjump.com/press/nypost001.pd and how about a great pinterest board with even more examples? https://www.pinterest.com/glasron/old-painted-building-signs/

When you travel to new places, do you notice unmarked bits of the past? Or is it easier to spot the evidence of history in your own hometown?

***

Today is the release day of The Detective’s Dilemma—set in the 1880s, when New York’s buildings were covered with hand painted signs! And how’s that for a tie-in?

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Thedetectivesdilemma240x360The Detective’s Dilemma

 Kidnapped by his own target, this crooked cop is having one bad day.

Detective Caleb Walker is foiled by his own industriousness. Determined to capture a criminal, he plants evidence—and is discovered by his higher-ups. Now blackmailed into acting as the strong-arm for a corrupt politician, he visits a poor widow he must convince to surrender her son. Yet something about her stirs his memory, and long-submerged desires. When she pulls a gun on him and demands he switch sides, he’s stunned, annoyed…and intrigued.

No one will take her son from Julianna. Least of all her sinister ex-father-in-law whose abuse damaged her late husband. With the handsome detective smirking in her sights, Julianna must convince him to help her keep her baby safe from the very people holding Caleb in their powerful grip. In a desperate bid, she kidnaps the cynical Caleb—and struggles to ignore the heat sparking between them.

As they pursue answers, secrets are uncovered—including Julianna’s and Caleb’s. Two imperfect hearts together may be enough to win the day. If their enemies don’t destroy them first.

A gaslight historical set in New York City.

“With colorful images, engaging characters and a fine eye for detail, Rothwell recreates the era beautifully.”-RT Bookclub (for Somebody Wonderful)

I’d love to do a give-away of my new book – The Detective’s Dilemma, or any of my New York set historicals! Comment below and win an ebook. Most are available through Amazon, Barnes and Noble and All Romance Ebooks, a few are Amazon Select only.

My other titles that have at least a scene or two in New York City:
Somebody Wonderful
Somebody to Love
Someone to Cherish
The Earl, the Girl, and the Promise
Powder of Sin
Love Between the Lines 

Kate also writes as Summer Devon. Most of those stories are hotter than Kate Rothwell titles and many are m/m historicals written with Bonnie Dee.

You can find her at:
https://www.facebook.com/S.DevonAuthor

http://katerothwell.com

http://summerdevon.com

 

A link today’s release, The Detective’s Dilemma. http://amzn.com/B010Y0MGO8emma  the title is currently only available on Amazon in Kindle format. 

 

Line for tweeting: Kate Rothwell has a new book out today! Celebrate her new release and her Word of the Day.

Label for the picture of New York:  from NYC Municipal Archives. http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/ A picture of Delancey Street shot more than one hundred years ago. Notice the Omega Oil sign? What’s old is new again!  

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