Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

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Winner

Cindy Kirk’s THREE winners are Laurie, Michelle and Kathryn!

Contact me at Cindy@cindykirk.com to claim your prize.

Thanks to everyone who commented and gave me such great suggestions!!

 

Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

A writer writes… that’s what we do. Over the years I’ve discovered crafting a story involves more than coming up with a viable plot and putting words down on the page in what you hope is a cohesive and compelling story. Where the story is set is also important. The town where the characters live and work has to be developed. Which means not only coming up with businesses in a fictional town, it’s naming the businesses and describing them so the reader can “see” them.  For me, fine-tuning the setting usually comes AFTER I name my characters and come up with their appearance and personality.

Power of Words

Even after I have the characters and the setting where I want them, I’m still not done.  In the town of Good Hope (where my current series is set) there are the special holidays/events to consider.  Right now I find myself trying to come up with the name of a wedding competition that will take place between Good Hope and two other communities in Door County.  I’d like to find something cute and catchy to call this competition, something along the lines of “Say Yes to the Dress.”  The best I’ve been able to come up with is One Fine Day (pathetic I know)–which I won’t use–but it’s a start. As this competition won’t take place in my current work-in-progress or even the book after that, I have time to come up with the perfect name.  Even when I do, I still won’t be done.  I’ll need to think up the rules and how the winner is determined.

That’s what I love about writing. There are so many opportunities to be creative. 🙂

As I wait for the next book in my Good Hope series to be released, I’ve been enjoying listening to my first book in the series on audio.

Christmas in Good Hope-cover final

Everyone who comments and gives me a potential name of a cute, large, scruffy mutt (yes, I need that for one of these future books) will be entered into a drawing to win Christmas in Good Hope either on CD’s or the MP3 audio version.  I’ll be giving out TWO sets of the CD’s and ONE of the MP3…so THREE chances to win. International winners will receive a KINDLE or AUDIBLE version.

Check back on Sunday to see if you’re a winner!

Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

I loved reading all the comments, so thanks to everyone who posted!!!

Kirsten,

Please contact me at cindy@cindykirk.com to claim your prize!!

Cindy Kirk

default-logo-200

Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

Cindy Kirk is pleased to announce she qualified for and has been added to the Romance Writers of America Honor Roll of best-selling authors

Cindy Kirk

default-logo-200

Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

For me, one of the fun things about writing a book is tossing in a detail or two that a reader may or may not pick up on.  If they do, it adds to their pleasure in the story.  If they don’t, nothing is lost.

In Christmas in Good Hope, there’s this piece of dialogue toward the end of the book:

She (Ami) pulled her hand away, her fingers fluttering to her neck.  “I don’t know what to say.”

“Saying you love me would be a good start.”

Whatever response she’d been about to make was silenced by the twins bursting through the front door yelling that they’d seen a werewolf on the side of the road with fangs and glowing yellow eyes.

Ami rose to her feet and sighed. She shook her head at her dad. “Didn’t I warn you not to tell the twins about the werewolf sightings in Jefferson County?”

“I think it was a big dog,” was all he said. “Or a bear.”

At the commotion, Ami’s sisters spilled into the living room and everyone began talking at once.  Beck heard the words claws, dog-face and pointed ears more times than he cared to remember over the next couple of hours. 

When I was doing some research on Door County, I ran into some information about werewolf sightings in nearby Jefferson county and thought it might be fun to include it in this book.

In a 2013 online article on the site Unexplained Mysteries, Paul Dale Roberts notes:

Werewolves have been seen in Wisconsin for a long, long time. The first sighting occurred in 1936. The witness Mark Schackelman said he encountered a talking wolfman. The wolfman was seen east of Jefferson, Wisconsin on Highway 18. Mark was driving along the road, when he saw a strange figure digging in an old Indian mound. He looked closer and saw that the figure was quite odd. This figure was fully covered with hair and stood erect. It stood more than 6 feet tall. This peculiar figure had a muzzle and resembled a dog, but also could have resembled an ape. The hands on this creature were mis-shapened with a twisted thumb and three fully formed fingers. The beast gave off a putrid smell that was like “decaying meat”. Special Note: Bigfoot is also known to have a putrid smell. Dennis Fewless in 1964 encountered werewolves just two miles away from the Mark Schackelman sighting. Fewless was driving home around midnight from his job at the Admiral Television Corp. in Harvard, Illinois. After turning onto Highway 89 from Highway 14, his headlights caught an animal running across the road in front of him. It was dark brown in color and he estimated that it weighed between 400 and 500 pounds. He also described it as being seven or eight feet tall. It ran across the highway, jumped a barbed wire fence and vanished. Fewless returned to the spot (in the daylight) hours to look for footprints or other evidence but the hard, sun-dried ground offered nothing. They did find where the corn had been pushed aside as the beast entered the field though. “I was awful scared that night,” Fewless told author Jay Rath. “That was no man. It was all hairy from head to feet.” Werewolves have been seen in Wisconsin for a long, long time. The sightings keep moving along, all the way to present times.

good hope

Are you a fan of a writer including such information in the story? Or don’t really care one way or another?  Everyone who comments will be entered into a drawing to win a copy of Christmas in Good Hope.  US winners will have their choice of a Kindle or print version.  An international winner will get a Kindle copy!

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