Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

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I’ll just say it.  I’m kind of particular about heroes in books.  

First, let’s talk physical attributes.  While I don’t mind a man with scruff, a goatee, or a day’s growth of beard, I really don’t like mustaches or full beards.  I don’t know why…that just doesn’t appeal to me..in real life or in the pages of a book.

Even though I’m more drawn to the lean, muscular type hovering around six foot (which equals my husband’s build), I don’t mind tall heroes built like linebackers.  I’m not real keen, however, on short heroes.

Eye color…no real preference.   Hair color…no real preference.

Personality traits–a core of kindness even if it’s under a gruff exterior is essential.  Cannot be mean or abusive to women, children, animals…or really anyone.  That’s doesn’t mean that the hero can’t fight or defend, but it must be for a good reason.

I prefer covers that don’t have a full face view of the hero.  While I understand this is often not even how the author pictured the hero, I still prefer to form my own image.  When I was a teenager I thought the author picked the person on the cover and it reflected how they saw the character (which was usually NOT how I envisioned the person).  I’m sure there are still readers out there who think the same thing.

I’d love to know what you like or don’t like in a hero.

One lucky person who comments and shares their thoughts will get an assortment of five romance novels mailed to them–including one of mine!

Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


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Latest Books

Everyone who has already commented wins a copy of Fortune’s Little Heartbreaker (or another book of their choice)!

International friends will receive an ebook copy of Baby on His Doorstep.

Thanks for all the lovely tributes to pets who have passed.

Contact me via my website www.cindykirk.com   and I’ll get your prize in the mail!

 

Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

 

I recently read a book–The Wedding by Julie Garwood–where the heroine’s horse is killed by some of her enemies.  For some reason, the death didn’t bother me.  (I’m not sure why).  Perhaps because I didn’t get to “know” the horse all that well.  If you’re thinking it was because the animal was a horse, that wasn’t it at all.  Remember the remake of True Grit where the horse died?  That bothered me a lot.

The fact is, I REALLY hate to see animals die in books, or in movies, or in real life. 

I remember in one of Janet’s Evanovitch’s  Stephanie Plum’s series where it appeared Rex, the hamster, might die.  I kept thinking…she better not let the bad guy kill Rex (she didn’t).

In one of JD Robb’s In Death series books, I thought another bad guy (how could it be a good guy?) was going to kill Galahad, the cat.  Again, I was sooo relieved that didn’t happen.

I guess it’s because I’m a huge animal lover and consider my “pets” as part of my family.

I’ve been thinking a lot lately of some of the furbabies I’ve lost through the years and want to take a moment to mention a few.

Sugar- a black toy poodle who loved football and would run with the ball carrier in front of the television.  He was also able to walk on his hind legs across the room.  He’d have made a great circus dog.

Comet- a white bichon who held the distinction of being the first dog to prefer me over my husband.  Comet was clearly “my boy” from the moment he was born.

Oreo- a black and white kitty who was a sweet girl.  Although she didn’t like to sit on my lap, she loved sitting on my keyboard.

Leo- a big, sweet white cat with a raccoon-like tail who loved sitting on my lap.

They’ve all crossed the rainbow bridge and I miss them all.

This week I’m giving away THREE copies of my latest book, Fortune’s Little Heartbreaker (or another book of mine if you already have this one).  The winners will be drawn from everyone who comments and tells me about an animal they know who’s crossed the rainbow bridge.  International commenters who win will win a copy of Baby on His Doorstep.  The names of the winners will be posted on Sunday so check back then!

Thanks for allowing me to share!

 

 

  

Cindy Kirk

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Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

Thanks to everyone who commented and made Trish feel so welcome.

Elizabeth and girlfromwva, please contact Trish through her website:  http://www.trishmilburn.com/contact/

She’ll get the books in the mail!

Cindy Kirk

default-logo-200

Cindy Kirk sold her first book in 1999 as a result of a contest win that garnered a critique of the entire manuscript. Patience Bloom, now Senior Editor for Romantic Suspense at Harlequin, not only critiqued the manuscript, she bought it! And she’s still Cindy’s editor to this today.

An author of twenty-five books for Harlequin, Cindy has also written two contemporary romances for Avon, and has been a Booksellers’ Best Award Winner, a finalist for the National Readers’ Choice Awards and a Waldenbooks / Borders best seller.

Cindy's Website


Social Media


Latest Books

Life’s little stumbling blocks

By Trish Milburn

Sometimes life throws you for a loop, literally.  This is something that the hero in my new book, The Doctor’s Cowboy, and I have in common.  For bull rider Wyatt Kelley, his trip to the ER comes after being gored by a bull.  For me, it was my dumb mistake of not turning on a light when I entered the room.  I tripped over a milk crate full of books and ended up breaking both bones in my wrist.

As writers, we are used to giving our characters obstacles to overcome.  For Wyatt, he has to face the fact that he can’t ride bulls, endangering his livelihood.  For me, I of course broke my right hand and I’m right-handed, making typing difficult.  I’ve been doing a lot of hunt and pecking with my left hand until my new microphone headset arrived, allowing me to use speech recognition software.  This blog post is the first document I’m dictating.  There is a learning curve as there is with anything new, but Wyatt also has to learn how to do things that were easy before in new ways that are not so easy.  He experiences frustration at having to depend on the heroine, Dr. Chloe Brody, for the simplest things.  This is not unlike my frustration at having to depend on my husband to put toothpaste on my toothbrush or open a soda bottle for me.

Even though we don’t like stumbling blocks in our real lives, they make for interesting journeys for our characters.  Readers enjoy stories in which they can root for the characters to overcome obstacles to achieve their happy ending, whether those obstacles are internal or external in nature. Wyatt’s external conflict, not being able to ride bulls and make a living, feeds into his internal conflict of not feeling worthy of the heroine.  We’ve all experienced situations where external forces have awakened internal turmoil.  When I broke my wrist, I felt bad because my mistake was going to cost us money for medical bills that simply turning on a light would have prevented.  But none of us, real or fictional, can undo what has been done.  We simply have to deal with the obstacles in our paths, learn from our mistakes, and move forward. Wyatt learns that he is worthy of love, and I learned that mistakes happen to all of us and there’s no use beating ourselves up over it.  Plus, I’m learning how to use this nifty speech recognition software, something that I might never have otherwise done.

I’m curious, what obstacles have you faced in your lives that were traumatic or stressful at the time but, looking back, actually led to something positive for you?

Trish's book

I will be giving away two signed copies of The Doctor’s Cowboy to two commenters today.  Giveaway is open to U.S. residents only. 

 Trish's picture

Trish Milburn is a fan of road trips, hikes in the woods, walking along the beach, watching TV and movies, cosplay and, of course, reading good books.  Hopefully none of these result in broken bones.  She writes for Harlequin American Romance and self-publishes young adult, romantic suspense, and women’s fiction novels.  Her next Harlequin American, The Doctor’s Cowboy, will release next month.  Find out more about Trish and her books at www.trishmilburn.com or follow her on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/trishmilburnauthor or Twitter @TrishMilburn

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